Tag Archives: Jan Kott

“On the desert island the history of the world has been performed. The performance is over; history begins once more.”

The Tempest Act Five, Part Three By Dennis Abrams ———————————— I want to conclude our examination of The Tempest with this, from the great Jan Kott: “Who is Prospero and what does his staff signify? Why does he combine knowledge … Continue reading

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“The history of mankind is madness, but in order to expose it, one has to perform it on a desert island.”

The Tempest Act Two, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ———————————- To continue where I left of last time with Jan Kott: “The Tempest has two endings: a quiet evening on the island, when Prospero forgives his enemies and the story … Continue reading

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“Coriolanus did not love the people. But this does not mean that Coriolanus should be condemned. In that sentence there is in a nutshell the bitter drama of Renaissance humanism; of any humanism, in fact.”

Coriolanus Act Five, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ———————————- From Jan Kott: “But Shakespeare’s world is crowded, and there are no empty spaces in it. There are just patricians, plebeians, and enemies of Rome. Coriolanus can only choose his place … Continue reading

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“’Coriolanus’, more even than ‘Julius Caesar’ and ‘Henry V,’ is Shakespeare’s political play.”

Coriolanus An Introduction By Dennis Abrams ——————————— Shakespeare’s final tragedy, Coriolanus is said to be his purest expression of classical tragic form, whereby a hero meets a sudden (and brutal) reversal of fate.  It seems likely that while researching his … Continue reading

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“Age cannot with her, nor custom stale./Her infinite variety.”

Antony and Cleopatra Act Two, Part One By Dennis Abrams ————————————— Act Two:  At Pompey’s camp, the news that Caesar has assembled an army is not exactly well-received. Antony has returned.  Meanwhile, Rome’s three rulers (the triumvirate) are locked in … Continue reading

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“Poor naked wretches, whereso’er you are,/That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm”

King Lear Act Three, Part Three By Dennis Abrams ————————————- I’d like to talk a bit more about Lear’s (and my) beloved Fool before we say goodbye to him. In the Quarto the Fool’s role ends with his participation in … Continue reading

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“I have full cause of weeping, but this heart/Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws/Or e’er I’ll weep. O fool, I shall go mad.”

King Lear Act Two, Part Three By Dennis Abrams ————————————— For my Sunday evening post, and before we dive into Act Three (perhaps the pinnacle OF the pinnacle that is King Lear), I thought we should step back a bit … Continue reading

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