Tag Archives: A.C. Bradley

“Coriolanus did not love the people. But this does not mean that Coriolanus should be condemned. In that sentence there is in a nutshell the bitter drama of Renaissance humanism; of any humanism, in fact.”

Coriolanus Act Five, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ———————————- From Jan Kott: “But Shakespeare’s world is crowded, and there are no empty spaces in it. There are just patricians, plebeians, and enemies of Rome. Coriolanus can only choose his place … Continue reading

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“Come, Let’s have one other gaudy night!”

Antony and Cleopatra Act Three, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ———————————— From A.C. Bradley: “The political situation and its development are simple. The story is taken up almost where it was left, years before, in Julius Caesar. There Brutus and … Continue reading

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“I have full cause of weeping, but this heart/Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws/Or e’er I’ll weep. O fool, I shall go mad.”

King Lear Act Two, Part Three By Dennis Abrams ————————————— For my Sunday evening post, and before we dive into Act Three (perhaps the pinnacle OF the pinnacle that is King Lear), I thought we should step back a bit … Continue reading

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“Lie with her? Lie on her?”

Othello Act Four, Part One By Dennis Abrams ———————- Act Four:  Iago continues to fuel Othello’s growing jealousy, to the point where he collapses in a fit.  When he recovers, Iago “arranges” for him to overhear a meeting with Cassio, … Continue reading

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“Iago, forever beyond Othello’s understanding, is not beyond ours, because we are more like Iago than we resemble Othello…”

Introduction to Othello Part Two By Dennis Abrams —————————————- To continue with our introduction to Othello, I’d like to start with more from Harold Bloom: “Auden, in one of his most puzzling critical essays [I’ll get to it later in … Continue reading

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“Of all Shakespeare’s tragedies…not even excepting King Lear, Othello is the most painfully exciting and the most terrible.”

Introduction to Othello By Dennis Abrams While it might not have the cosmic or philosophical heft and resonance of Hamlet or King Lear, Shakespeare’s second great tragedy, Othello, is often felt to be his most gripping – and tormenting – … Continue reading

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“Your worm is your only emperor for diet: we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots.”

Hamlet Act Four, Part One By Dennis Abrams ————————————— Act Four:  Realizing the danger he is in, Claudius hurriedly sends Hamlet to England with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, but secretly arranges for him to be killed on arrival.  Ophelia, in the … Continue reading

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