Tag Archives: Introduction

“His purposes here are very enigmatic, he abandons his career-long concern with character and personality and presents a darker, more remote or estranged vision of human life than ever before.”

The Two Noble Kinsmen An Introduction By Dennis Abrams After the political intrigue of Henry VIII, it would be difficult to imagine a play more different than the one which followed it onto the stage. The Two Noble Kinsmen concluded … Continue reading

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“But what the world is cannot be said in a sentence. Or even in a poem as complete and beautiful as ‘The Tempest.’”

The Tempest An Introduction By Dennis Abrams ——————————– The Tempest is one of Shakespeare’s most cherished works.  Yet, at the same, it can seem his most abstruse, and even at time unfathomable. It recounts the story of an exiled Italian … Continue reading

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“I have a quite unjustifiable sense that Shakespeare would like us to experience this play as somehow taking place at the very periphery of vision, where lands and times and events merge together…”

Cymbeline An Introduction By Dennis Abrams ———————————————– Even now, no one is quite certain exactly why Cymbeline, one of Shakespeare’s final comedies (if that’s truly what it is), was included in the list of “Tragedies” in the First Folio, but … Continue reading

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“’Coriolanus’, more even than ‘Julius Caesar’ and ‘Henry V,’ is Shakespeare’s political play.”

Coriolanus An Introduction By Dennis Abrams ——————————— Shakespeare’s final tragedy, Coriolanus is said to be his purest expression of classical tragic form, whereby a hero meets a sudden (and brutal) reversal of fate.  It seems likely that while researching his … Continue reading

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“‘King Lear’ gives one the impression of life’s abundance magnificently compressed into one play.”

King Lear An Introduction By Dennis Abrams ———————————— We are now, I think, at the peak of Mount Shakespeare.  King Lear has long had a reputation as the ultimate in tragedy – this tale of a difficult father driven mad … Continue reading

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“Iago, forever beyond Othello’s understanding, is not beyond ours, because we are more like Iago than we resemble Othello…”

Introduction to Othello Part Two By Dennis Abrams —————————————- To continue with our introduction to Othello, I’d like to start with more from Harold Bloom: “Auden, in one of his most puzzling critical essays [I’ll get to it later in … Continue reading

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“Of all Shakespeare’s tragedies…not even excepting King Lear, Othello is the most painfully exciting and the most terrible.”

Introduction to Othello By Dennis Abrams While it might not have the cosmic or philosophical heft and resonance of Hamlet or King Lear, Shakespeare’s second great tragedy, Othello, is often felt to be his most gripping – and tormenting – … Continue reading

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