Tag Archives: war

“When thou can’st get the ring upon my finger, which never shall come off, and show me a child begotten of thy body that I am father to, then call me husband, but in such a ‘then’ I write a ‘never.’”

All’s Well That Ends Well Act Three By Dennis Abrams ——————————— Act Three:  The Countess’s delight on hearing the news of the marriage quickly turns sour when she receives a letter from Bertram declaring that he has fled. Helena announces … Continue reading

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“Desdemona and Othello, alas, scarcely know each other, and sexually do not know each other at all.”

Othello Act Two, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ———————————— To continue on where we left off in my last post with Bloom: “Iago derides Othello’s ‘weak function’; that seems more a hint of Iago’s impotence than of Othello’s, and yet … Continue reading

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“Othello’s tragedy is precisely that Iago should know him better than the Moor knows himself.”

Othello Act One, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ——————————————— First off – a few interesting points (or at least hopefully so): 1.  What prompted Shakespeare to write Othello?  One intriguing possibility is that the ambassador of the King of Barbary … Continue reading

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“Of all Shakespeare’s tragedies…not even excepting King Lear, Othello is the most painfully exciting and the most terrible.”

Introduction to Othello By Dennis Abrams While it might not have the cosmic or philosophical heft and resonance of Hamlet or King Lear, Shakespeare’s second great tragedy, Othello, is often felt to be his most gripping – and tormenting – … Continue reading

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“Time hath, my lord,/A wallet at his back, wherein he puts/Alms for oblivion, a great-sized monster/Of ingratitudes.”

Troilus and Cressida Act Three, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ————————————— From Marjorie Garber: “Another of Ulysses’ remarkable and resonant speeches, echoing down the ages, will demonstrate a similar point. [MY NOTE:  She’s referring to Thersites’ parody of his ‘degree’ … Continue reading

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“This is the monstruosity in love, lady: that the will is infinite, and the execution confined: that the desire is boundless, and the act a slave to limit.”

Troilus and Cressida Act Three, Part One By Dennis Abrams ————————- Act Three:  Pandarus has finally arranged a meeting between Troilus and Cressida, but doesn’t exactly leave them alone. Initially nervous, the couple make a vow of mutual constancy before … Continue reading

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“Take but degree away, untune that string,/And, hark, what discord follows!”

Troilus and Cressida Act One, Part Two By Dennis Abrams ————————————– I’d like to continue our examination of Act One with this, from Harold Bloom: “Some critics have traced the origins of Troilus and Cressida to the Poet’s War fought … Continue reading

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